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https://www.dallasnews.com/arts/books/2017/09/02/ken-follett-column-fire-interview-dallas

EXCERPT:

Joyce Sáenz Harris, Special Contributor
The Dallas Morning News

For the first decade of his career as a writer, British novelist Ken Follett was widely known as a master of the thriller genre, with best-selling novels of the late 1970s and early ’80s such as Eye of the Needle and The Key to Rebecca. Then he surprised everyone in 1989 with The Pillars of the Earth, an ambitious and wildly popular historical epic set in the Middle Ages in the fictional English town of Kingsbridge.

Pillars, which focused on the building of a cathedral in the mid-1100s, was followed 18 years later by World Without End, which picks up the Kingsbridge saga 157 years later, in the early 1300s.

The third Kingsbridge entry, A Column of Fire (Viking, $36), is set in the Elizabethan era and will be published Sept. 12. This time, religious intolerance is barely held in check as great empires clash, naval underdogs triumph, and the art of spying flourishes along with romance, adventure and betrayal.

Follett, who has sold about 160 million copies of his books over his 68 years, will discuss and sign his latest Sept. 14 under the auspices of the Dallas Museum of Art’s Arts & Letters Live series; he’ll do a signing-only event the next day at Interabang Books. Dallas is one of only three U.S. cities where he’ll do events for the book, which he discussed by email.

A Column of Fire is set during the late Tudor and early Stuart monarchies, with a hero, Ned Willard, who becomes one of Queen Elizabeth’s top spies. It’s the third of your Kingsbridge novels, on which you’ve worked for more than 30 years. Does this complete the story of Kingsbridge?

I’m not sure the story of Kingsbridge will ever be complete. The city has come to stand for England in my novels. And readers love it. So Kingsbridge will probably go on as long as I do.

Ned takes part in many government intrigues provoked by religious strife, including the execution of Mary Stuart, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and the foiling of the Gunpowder Plot. How did men like Ned act as the forerunners of today’s MI6 and MI5 —the foreign- and domestic-intelligence arms of Her Majesty’s Secret Service?

Researching A Column of Fire I was surprised and amused by how much of the paraphernalia of modern espionage was invented by the Elizabethans. They had invisible ink, secret codes, expert codebreakers, and master forgers. They used surveillance and disinformation. And, like modern security services, they often got things wrong.

For the complete interview, see:
https://www.dallasnews.com/arts/books/2017/09/02/ken-follett-column-fire-interview-dallas

 

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